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"Trying to sell your product world-wide?" by Kerri Moseley-Hobbs

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kerri_exotic_headshot.jpgCollege Wizard: Trying to sell your product World-wide?
By Kerri Moseley-Hobbs

Along with other dramatic changes currently in the works on Capital Hill and local state governments, there is a call and a vision for advanced and improved education. Commonly, we hear about K-12 - how do we improve on grade school education. But what the public eye is failing to realize, is that the plan is not to improve K-12 education, but to establish a working relationship between K-12 and higher education. The movement simply is, K-12 should be the beginning of education, and higher education should be automatic.

The initial plan is not to render everyone into university level education with ever growing tuitions and fees that outgrow inflation rates, but to stress one important fact: that associate degrees and bachelor's degrees are the new high school diplomas. Here is one theory why. As if the term "world" didn't already mean, well "everything", in the past 20 years or so, it has become obvious that what we are living in, and what we are doing business in, is a "global" or "world" economy.

The big picture in business is not to conquer or touch the nation, but to tap into and taste the world. This is important for the survival of not only the individual family, but for the nation as a whole. Did you know that the U.S ranks 15th out of 29 developed countries for college graduates? Did you know that it is estimated that by 2020 most jobs will be intellectual and will require more skills than the workforce can offer at our current rate of education? To put the need for education for a global market, to make it more personal to you as an artist, consider this when thinking of making the entertainment business your career:

"Global sales via the Internet, mobile phones and other digital methods rose 12 percent last year to $4.2 billion. Digital sources accounted for 27 percent of recording industry revenue, up from 21 percent a year earlier, the trade group said." (PFanner, 2010; retrieved from the New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/22/business/global/22music.html).

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